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Latest Xen Project Blog Posts

Future of Xen Project: Video Spotlight Interview with Xen Project’s Chairperson Lars Kurth

Lars Kurth had his first contact with the open source community in 1997 when he worked on various parts of the ARM toolchain. He has since become an open source enthusiasts, worked on several open source communities, and is the chairperson of the Xen Project Advisory Board. He is also the Director of the Xen […]

Xen Project 4.4.4 Maintenance Release is Available

I am pleased to announce the release of Xen 4.4.4. Xen Project Maintenance releases are released in line with our Maintenance Release Policy. We recommend that all users of the 4.4 stable series update to this point release. Xen 4.4.4 is available immediately from its git repository:     xenbits.xenproject.org/gitweb/?p=xen.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/stable-4.4     (tag RELEASE-4.4.4) or from the Xen Project […]

Why GlobalLogic Uses Xen (Overheard at CES)

We were lucky to have the opportunity to meet up with GlobalLogic at CES and talk to them about their Nautilus platform for automotive virtualization. A few years ago, no one understood why the company was demoing hypervisor technology as a part of Nautilus, a set of solution accelerators that includes architectural concepts, a modified […]

Latest Planet Blog Posts

Avoiding dead code: pv_ops is not the silver bullet

This is part I - for part II - see "Xen and the Linux x86 zero page""Code that should not run should never run"The fact that code that should not run should never run seems like something stupid and obvious but it turns out that its actually easier said than done on very large software projects, particularly on the Linux kernel. One term for this is "dead code". The amount of dead code on Linux has increased over the years due to the desire by Linux distributions to want a single Linux kernel binary to work on different run time environments....

Linux asynchronous probe - let's try this again

Updated on 2016-01-19 with description on issue of how systemd limits the number of devices on a Linux system and references to asynchronous work on memory. Edits reflected in this color.Hipster and trendy init systems want to boot really fast. As of v4.2 the Linux kernel now sports asynchronous probe support (this fix posted December 19, 2015 is needed for use of the generic async_probe module parameter). This isn't the first time such type of work has been attempted on Linux though, this lwn article claims that a long time ago some folks tried to enable asynchronous probe and that ultimately...