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Latest Xen Project Blog Posts

Xen Project 4.4.4 Maintenance Release is Available

I am pleased to announce the release of Xen 4.4.4. Xen Project Maintenance releases are released in line with our Maintenance Release Policy. We recommend that all users of the 4.4 stable series update to this point release. Xen 4.4.4 is available immediately from its git repository:     xenbits.xenproject.org/gitweb/?p=xen.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/stable-4.4     (tag RELEASE-4.4.4) or from the Xen Project […]

Why GlobalLogic Uses Xen (Overheard at CES)

We were lucky to have the opportunity to meet up with GlobalLogic at CES and talk to them about their Nautilus platform for automotive virtualization. A few years ago, no one understood why the company was demoing hypervisor technology as a part of Nautilus, a set of solution accelerators that includes architectural concepts, a modified […]

ARM hosts Xen Project Hackathon, April 18-19 in Cambridge, UK

I am pleased to announce the next Xen Project Hackathon. The Hackathon will be hosted by ARM in their Cambridge Headquarters from April 18 and 19. I wanted to thank Philippe Robin and Thomas Molgaard from ARM for hosting the Hackathon. ARM designs technology that is at the heart of advanced digital products and has […]

Latest Planet Blog Posts

Xen and the x86 Linux zero page

This is part II, for part I - refer to "Avoiding dead code: pv_ops is not the silver bullet".On x86 Linux the boot sequence is rather complicated, so much so that it has its own dedicated boot protocol. This is documented upstream on Documentation/x86/boot.txt. The protocol tends to evolve as the x86 architecture evolves, in order to compensate for new features or extensions which could we need to learn about at boot time. Of interest to this post is the "zero page". The first step when loading a Linux kernel is to load the "zero page", this consists of a...

Avoiding dead code: pv_ops is not the silver bullet

This is part I - for part II - see "Xen and the Linux x86 zero page""Code that should not run should never run"The fact that code that should not run should never run seems like something stupid and obvious but it turns out that its actually easier said than done on very large software projects, particularly on the Linux kernel. One term for this is "dead code". The amount of dead code on Linux has increased over the years due to the desire by Linux distributions to want a single Linux kernel binary to work on different run time environments....